9 Inspirational Female Leaders That Are Not Hilary Clinton

Via Twitter.

The fact that Hilary Clinton might become the first female president of the most powerful country in the world is quite an accomplishment. She might be the source of inspiration to so many young girls in the world, but I totally disagree. I’m not saying she shouldn’t be your source of inspiration, I’m just saying that she’s American, white, wife of a former United States president, socially-accepted and has no reason to be called a terrorist. I genuinely still get you if she’s your role model, but to us Arabs, we draw our inspiration from other strong female leaders. Arabs ones. Ones that understand how it feels to be us, and still went on against the stream and triumphed. Here are examples of Arab female role models every Arab girl should grow up learning about.

 

 

Hanan Al-Horoub 

 

Via Arab Personalities Tumblr.
Via Arab Personalities Tumblr.

 

Hanan grew up in a Palestinian refugee camp at Bayt Lahem, where she was regularly exposed to acts of violence and eventually chose to be a teacher to help Palestinian children to overcome the horrific scenes they witness frequently without developing aggressive characters. She won the Global Teacher Prize 2016  for her “play and learn” technique in which she integrated games with lessons to reach her learning objectives.

 

 

Dame Nemat Talaat Shafik

 

Via Blog IMF.
Via Blog IMF.

 

Also known as Minouche Shafik. Shafik became the first-ever deputy governor of the Bank of England in August 2014, and just recently, she was announced as the next director of the London School of Economics only to become first woman in history to run the position.

 

 

Mariam Al Mansouri

 

Via The National.
Via The National.

 

Major Mariam Al Mansouri may be ISIS’ worst nightmare. The first female fighter pilot in the United Arab Emirates, she led a strike mission against ISIS in October 2014. Her dream ever since she finished high school was to become a fighter pilot.  Unfortunately at that time women were not allowed, so she had to wait 10 years to finally fulfill her dream.

 

 

Sara Ahmed

 

Via Independent.
Via Independent.

 

Rio 2016: Egypt’s Sara Ahmed becomes first Arab woman to win Olympic weightlifting medal.The 18-year-old is also the first Egyptian woman to win an Olympic medal in the country’s 104-year history at the Games.

 

 

Suzanne Al Houby

 

Via Tumblr.
Via Tumblr.

 

This mother of two has become the first Arab and Palestinian woman to conquer the mountaineering challenge of the seven summits of the world including the highest of all of Mountain Everest.

 

 

Tawakkul Karman

 

Via Daily Mail.
Via Daily Mail.

 

The first Arab woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011. The Yemeni journalist dedicated her life in favor of promoting freedom of speech. In 2005, she set up the campaign group “Women Journalists Without Chains”. Two years later, she invoked protests in the Yemeni capital and eventually became the mouthpiece of the 2011 Yemeni uprisings.

 

 

Dame Zaha Hadid

 

Via Twitter.
Via Twitter.

 

The Iraqi-born architect became the first woman to win the prestigious Pritzker Prize for Architecture in its 26-year history in 2004. She as well received the Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011. Upon her death in March 2016 London Mayor Boris Johnson wrote on Twitter: “So sad to hear of death of Zaha Hadid, she was an inspiration and her legacy lives on in wonderful buildings in Stratford and around the world.”

 

 

Khawla Al Khuraya

 

Via The Sun.
Via The Sun.

 

A Saudi physician and cancer specialist. Khawla was awarded the Order of Abdulaziz al Saud in 2010 on her cancer research and identifying a gene that encourages the formation of cancer cells in the human body. She was the first woman to receive the award. She was pictured with King Abdullah shaking her hand and placing the medal on her neck, a scene that was described as unprecedented at that time.

 

 

Haifa Al Mansour

 

Via Alchetron.
Via Alchetron.

 

The first female Saudi filmmaker and perhaps the most controversial one. Her film Wadjda was the first Saudi movie to be entered in the Oscars as Best Foreign Language Film. Although Wadjda did not win, the film won numerous awards, including three prizes at the 2012 Venice Film Festival. Her films shed light on the nature and secrets of the conservative society of Saudi Arabia.

 

 

WE SAID THIS: Who run the world? ARAB WOMEN!

 

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