Celebrating World Tourism Day With Serene Destinations Across The Middle East

Today we celebrate World Tourism Day, which has been observed annually on Sept. 27 since 1980. The focus of World Tourism Day this year is to reconsider the role of tourism in development and the industry’s impact on the environment and the potential for more sustainable growth. The day’s main aim is to aspire local communities, governments, and corporations to strive for a more resilient, inclusive, and sustainable tourism industry.

The Middle East is then a haven for eco-friendly tourism with spots that you can visit to reconnect with nature and make your touristic experience unforgettable.

Wadi Mujib, Jordan

The Mujib Reserve is the lowest nature reserve in the world and is located close to the Dead Sea’s eastern shore according to Jordan Tourism Board. It is situated within the vast Wadi Mujib valley, which is 410 meters below sea level and enters the Dead Sea. There are more than 300 plant species, 10 carnivore species, and a large number of resident and migratory bird species. Depending on traffic, it takes about 30 minutes to go from the Dead Sea resorts, over an hour to get from Madaba city, and about 90 minutes to get from Amman to Wadi Mujib.

Djémila, Algeria

Some of the best-preserved Roman ruins in Africa may be discovered in this small village settlement in Algeria, which is located close to the country’s northern coast east of Algiers. It has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1982. You can find there ancient Roman ruins like the Arch of Caracalla, a well-preserved spa complex, temples such as the Temple of Venus Genitrix, and the Antoninus Pius Theater. Additionally, there is an impressive collection of mosaic paving stones that depict mythological stories from the past.

Tafraoute, Morocco

Tafraoute is home to the Amazigh (Berber) which is an ethnic group indigenous to North Africa, specifically to Morocco. To learn more about the town, you can take a private trip from Agadir to Tafraout where you’ll pass through a rocky landscape of colorful valleys, lush palm oases, and old granaries. You can also try your luck and visit a local Berber home to know more about their culture, and traditions, and perhaps get a meal! Other Tafraoute attractions are largely centered on the region’s rocks. For example, the painted rocks, which were painted by Belgian artists in the 1980s, the so-called gazelle rock carving, and Napoleon’s hat collection of boulders on the way out of town towards Aguerd Oudad.

Baatara Gorge Waterfall, Lebanon 

The waterfall, which was found in 1952, is situated in the village of Balaa, halfway between Tannourine and Laqlouq. This waterfall in Baatara Gorge plunges 255 meters into a limestone cavern. There are many individuals with climbing equipment on the nearby hills, and the region is particularly well-liked for sporting events. It takes about two hours to travel 76 kilometers from Beirut. According to Culture Trip, the waterfall is the result of millions of years’ worth of limestone erosion. Also, geologists claim that it is roughly 160 million years old and would have existed when dinosaurs inhabited the region.

Al Mughsail Beach, Oman

Al Mughsayl Beach is one of the most famous tourist attractions in Dhofar, Oman. The beach is located outside of Salalah; around 40 minute’s drive away. It is a long stretch of blue water sea and white sand with magnificent landscapes. The beach has mountains on both sides, which makes the view elegant and photogenic. Also, It’s a perfect picnic spot or for bird watchers, Mughsail Beach is a paradise as it hosts varieties of birds that can be spotted along the beach. As for the sunset, Al Mughsayl Beach showcases guests a golden hour for picnickers and strollers.

You can take a trip and escape the hustle and bustle to relax and unwind while remaining mindful of the environment and wildlife rather than visiting the conventional tourist and commercial destinations in these nations.

WE SAID THIS: Don’t forget….Sustainability & Comfort: 6 Eco-Friendly Havens In The Middle East

Comments
Loading...
Tweet
Share
Share
Pin