An Egyptian Conservation Group Rescues Migratory Bird Along Red Sea Coast

Last week, the white stork started its migration from their summer breeding grounds in Europe to South Africa. During this time, this migratory bird becomes quite prominent throughout different parts of Egypt, especially the Red Sea coast and South Sinai.

These birds migrate in flocks of thousands, soaring as high as 1,500 meters above sea levels. With white and black plumage, two majestic wings, and long legs, the white stork has an unmistakable air about it.

On Saturday, while migrating through Egypt, six white storks where found dead and one injured near Ras Shokair airport. It seems that these birds met their fate upon colliding into one distribution power line. Six birds were electrocuted and one had a wing injury.

Once Nature Conservation Egypt (NCE) arrived at the site, they quickly rushed the stork to Ras Ghareb Veterinary Care Unit. The team along with the bird spent the night at the Directorate of Agriculture. On the next morning, owing to is severe injury, the stork was transferred to the Bluemoon Animal Center in Hurghada.

Once it has completed its treatment, the bird will be released along the Rift Valley/Red Sea migratory route to continue its journey to South Africa.

The NCE is a non-governmental organization established in 2005 that aims to conserve Egyptian natural heritage for future generations. With demonstration of practical conservation measures, awareness raising activities, studies, and lobbying, the group is dedicated to promoting the sustainability of the Egyptian fauna.

Via Facebook.

In an official statement, the group vowed to work with key stakeholders to bring the conservation of migratory birds into the mainstream within the energy sector in accordance with sustainable development goals.

Via Facebook.

WE SAID THIS: We hope the little white storks is back in the air soaring south.

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